Tag Archive for 'php design patterns'

Sandlight CMS II : Mobile First!

mobileFirstI’m not a graphic designer, and so I depend on others for the graphic elements and arrangement of my Web pages. However, I strive to make a site that is clear, easy to understand and useful. My focus is on good user experience (UX) and information design—clear communication with the user. In order to have good UX, you need to know something about Responsive Web Design (RWD), and if you don’t, check out the RWD link. Further, if you are unfamiliar with the approaches to RWD, I’m sold on the Mobile First approach, but possibly for different reasons than designers. Let me explain.

In designing my own site, my focus is on content categories, ease of maintenance, which includes updates and changes, and device flexibility. So I have to keep all of those in mind. I want PHP to handle regular updates by using content from a MySql database (the Content Management of CMS), and I need it to work on different devices. By tackling mobile first, I have to create a diamond-tipped focus on exactly what I want the user to view because even with the new “Phablets,” I’m not dealing with a lot of screen real estate. Currently, my old working mobile phone has a CSS resolution of 320 x 480, and my Phablet is 414 x 736. That’s less that 100 units different. (By CSS resolution, I’m referring to what CSS reads as far as screen width is concerned. See this table.)

Choosing the Devices

In an another sniffer program using a Chain of Responsibility (CoR) design pattern and a PHP user agent ($_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT']) posted on this blog, the sniffer detected the user agent and then found the handler responsible for that agent. Now that user agents have been replaced by CSS screen width (as determined by a JavaScript function) for determining the device, we can use the same CoR pattern making the necessary changes. However, instead of getting real pages, we can use stand-ins that only have the roughest page content. All of the content will be encapsulated into PHP classes using heredoc strings. Near-future posts cover the mechanics of working out the MySql to provide dynamic content for the pages, along with other details necessary for the CMS. For now, though, the dummy pages will only contain enough material to demonstrate that each is appropriate for the selected device. Use the buttons below to see the current state of the CMS and download the files for this portion:
PlayDownload

Note that all devices can now access the Flag Counter. Where is your country on the Flag Counter? (See the note about the Flag Counter at the end of this post.)

Back to the Chain of Responsibility Pattern (CoR)

The CoR pattern is handy because it’s easy to update and change. For example, suppose that having three device categories (e.g., phone, tablets and desktops) proves to be inadequate and you want to add two more; one for laptops and another for phablets. It’s a simple matter to add to the chain and add device classes to handle the new devices. Figure 1 shows the first design pattern to be used in the CMS:

Figure 1: Chain of Responsibility Implementation

Figure 1: Chain of Responsibility Implementation

In Part I of this series, you can see how the device width and height is determined using a JavaScript closure (object) to pass the information to HTML and on to PHP. Since we only need to find the width, the JavaScript code has been slightly altered and placed in a separate file (deviceCatcher.js) in case it needs to be reused.

?View Code JAVASCRIPT
//deviceCatcher.js
function getWide()
{
	var wide = screen.width;
	return function()
	{
		return wide;
	}
}
var w = getWide();
//Send data to PHP class, CoRClient.php	
var lambdaPass= function() {window.location.href = "CoRClient.php?hor=" + w();};

The HTML file simply calls the closure function which passes the values to PHP:

<html>
	<head>
		<title>Device Catcher</title>
		<script src="deviceCatcher.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
	</head>
	<body onload=lambdaPass()>
	</body>
</html>

The HTML file is a trigger to get the ball rolling with the client class (CoRClient).

Starting the Chain

The client pulls the viewing device’s width from the superglobal, and passes it to a PHP variable. Given the variability in the width of device screens, I made the decision to work with three sizes to get started: 1) phone, 2) tablet, and 3) desktop. So, depending on the width, the request would be handled by one of those three device groups. I used the following cutoff sizes:

  1. Phone: >= 480
  2. Tablet: >=481 and < 900
  3. Desktop: >= 900

I used this table as a guide, but cutoff points can be anything you want.

Getting the width from the superglobal is easy enough using a static variable:

self::$wide=$_GET['hor'];

The, using the cutoffs, the program needs to generate three strings, phone, tablet, and desktop to send to the Request class that stores the appropriate string. The most obvious way is to use conditional statements (if or switch) to generate the correct string for Request. For example an imperative algorithm such as the following would do the trick:

if(self::$wide < = 480)
{
	return "phone";
}
elseif (self::$wide >= 900)
{
	return "desktop";
}
else
{
	return "tablet";
}

However, a functional program would be more compact, and like the JavaScript closure used in Part I, it would be an “object.” Transformed into a functional closure, the operation would look like the following:

$beta = self::$wide >= 900 ? 'desktop' : 'tablet';
$lambda = function($x) use ($beta) {
	$alpha =  $x < = 480 ? 'phone' : $beta;
	return $alpha;};

Using ternary operations ?: , $alpha and $beta both have function-like qualities. for example, $beta could have been written as a function beta() as shown in Figure 2:

Figure 2: "Functional" variables

Figure 2: “Functional” variables

As you can see in Figure 2, $beta provides the same functionality as beta(), and $beta can be used as a reference in the $lambda function along with $alpha in a PHP closure. (For some reason, when $beta is assigned an anonymous function, I was unable to get it to be added as a closure in the $lambda anonymous function.)
Continue reading ‘Sandlight CMS II : Mobile First!’

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PHP Class Origins: An OOP Job for the HTML UI

couchPotatoPutting HTML to Work

At some point in OOP development with PHP, I quit putting little PHP code snippets in HTML. I either left all PHP out of HTML or encapsulated HTML in a PHP heredoc string inside a class. In that way, all PHP would be part of an OOP order without any loose ends. That may seem overly fussy, but it avoids the slippery slope of degenerating back into sequential programming——patchwork quilt programming.

However, such a practice should not disallow HTML from helping out in an OOP project. A lot of times, I found myself sifting through class and method options using more conditional statements than I wanted in the Client. I realized that I could just pass the class name directly to the Client from a superglobal with origins in an HTML input form. Likewise, I could do the same for methods, and this has become a useful standard operating procedure.

To better illustrate using the HTML UI in launching a selected class object, the following application uses the color and number input elements with both class and method information stored in HTML element values. Both are trivial, but help illustrate the point: (Use Firefox, Chrome or Opera–neither Safari nor Internet Explorer implemented the HTML5 standard color input element.)
PlayDownload

It’s odd in a way that PHP developers (myself included) are so used to using HTML UIs for data input into MySql databases or making other choices, but few use the UI for calling classes and methods. However, it’s both easy and practical.

Where to Put the OOP in HTML?

You can place class and method names as values anywhere in form inputs that you’d put any data passed to PHP as superglobals. One input form I found useful is the hidden one. It’s out of the way, and you can build forms around the class with other superglobal inputs as methods. Using radio button inputs is another nice option because you can use them either for calling classes or methods with the mutual exclusivity assurance of knowing that not more than one will be called from a given group. To get started, take a look at the HTML:

< !DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <link type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" href="tech.css"/>
    <title>Unsetting Superglobals with Classes and Methods</title>
</head>
 
<body>
    <h3>Classes and Methods</h3>
<form name="alpha" action="Client.php" method="post" target="feedback">
    Choose color from the color window:<br />
    <input type="hidden" name="class" value="ColorClass"/>
    <input type="hidden" name="method" value="doColor"/><br />
    <input type="color" name="colorNow" value="#cc0000"/>
    <p>
    <input type="submit" value="Get Color"/>
    </p> 
</form>
<form name="beta" action="Client.php" method="post" target="feedback">
    Divide or modulo the following two numbers:<br />
    <input type="hidden" name="class" value="MathClass"/>
    First:&nbsp;<input type="number" name="first" value=2/>&nbsp;
    &nbsp;Second:&nbsp;<input type="number" name="second" value=7/>
 
    <br /><input type="radio" name="method" value="doDivide"/>
    &nbsp;Divide the second by the first<br />
    <input type="radio" name="method" value="doModulo" checked=true/>
    &nbsp;Modulo the second by the first<br />
    <p>
    <input type="submit" value="Do Math"/>
    </p> 
</form>
<iframe name="feedback">feedback</iframe>
</body>
</html>

The code has two forms, alpha and beta, and you can think of them as I/O for two different classes. The feedback is returned to the iframe named feedback. Both forms have the action calls to Client.php. So the general plan is:

Client → Class->method()

In the alpha form, the class is ColorClass and the method is doColor()—both in hidden input elements. The name for the class element is “class” and the name for the method element is “method.” All the user does is to choose a color that is passed through the superglobal associated with the color input element.

In the beta form, the class is MathClass placed in a hidden input element. The user chooses either a division or modulo operation from the two radio input elements where the names of the appropriate methods are stored. Once again, the name for the class element is “class” and with mutually exclusive choices the radio button elements for selecting the method, the name is “method.” In this way, whatever superglobal named “class” will fire the correct class and call the correct method with the superglobal named “method.”

The Client

As usual, the Client is the launching pad for the operations. If your application uses different client classes depending on user choices, it’s an easy matter to have unique client names for different forms. In this particular case, the Client class doesn’t care about the form of origin for the request. It just takes the class superglobal and method superglobal names and generates a call to the appropriate class and method.

As an aside, the Client in OOP should not be as rare as some perceive it to be. In one way or another, users (or non-human request mechanisms) employ some way to request that the software do something. The Client, as a participant in a structure, is in virtually every design pattern in one way or another. Even when the Client is not directly or implicitly in a design pattern, The Gang of Four reference it as related to one of the participants in the pattern. So while this example does not use a design pattern, the Client works perfectly well in any OOP program.

< ?php
/*
 * Set up error reporting and
 * class auto-loading
*/
error_reporting(E_ALL | E_STRICT);
ini_set("display_errors", 1);
// Autoload given function name.
function includeAll($className)
{
    include_once($className . '.php');
}
//Register
spl_autoload_register('includeAll');
 
//Class definition
class Client
{
    private static $object, $method;
    //client request
    public static function request()
    {  
        self::doSuper();
        $operation = new self::$object();
        echo $operation->{self::$method}();
    }
 
    private static function doSuper()
    {
        self::$object = $_POST['class'];
        self::$method=$_POST['method'];
        unset($_POST['class']);
        unset($_POST['method']);
    }
}
Client::request();
?>

The Client file first takes care of error reporting and automatically calling classes. One experienced developer told me that adding an error-reporting function was unnecessary because it could be automatically turned on in the php.ini file. That’s true, but since I work with many different PHP environments where I have no control over the php.ini file, I’ve found it to be a good practice. You only have to put it in once place, and it takes care of error reporting for the entire program. Besides, I found that one safeguard against easy hacking is to turn off error reporting so that hackers cannot see the names of the classes involved in the application. For this blog, though, I leave the error reporting on because there’s nothing on this blog I want to hide. (Change the init_set from “1” to “0” to turn off all error-reporting.)

No Returns from Constructor Functions

The first incarnation of this application used the same two forms, but the alpha form only had the class name with the results planned to be sent back for output using a return statement. I kept getting errors, and then I learned that constructor functions (those using the __construct() method) have no returns. All they do is to instantiate the class. If you do not use the __construct() method, there’s an invisible automatic constructor function that does that for your as soon as you call new ClassName().
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PHP Visitor Design Pattern II: The Double Dispatch

visitor2x

The Visitor pattern uses a double dispatch even with languages that are inherently single dispatch (such as PHP). In this second installment of the Visitor, I’d like to look at the concept and utility of double dispatch and role of the ObjectStructure in creating a working Visitor example that can be transformed into a practical application.

In Part I PHP Visitor Design Pattern I: The Single Dispatch, the focus was on using a single dispatch and a “pretend visitor.” This post shows how to create a visitor object based on both a Visitor interface and ConcreteVisitor implementations that are used in concert with the Element participants via the ObjectStructure. In order to do this, a couple more concrete Elements have been added to the example begun in Part I of the Visitor.

The Visitor Design Pattern Diagram

The Part I Visitor post suggests that the Visitor class diagram is a bit daunting, and so I held off until now to show it. If you look at the bottom portion of Figure 1, you will see that the example in Part I handled all of the Element participants, and included a “pretend visitor” where the Accept(Visitor) implementation in an actual Visitor pattern goes. So, you have some idea of what close to half of the Visitor does.

Figure 1: Visitor Class Diagram

Figure 1: Visitor Class Diagram

You can get a hint at what double-dispatch is by looking at the dual connections that the Client has to both the Visitor and Element (via the ObjectStructure). In the pattern, the Client is implied, but it’s clear to see the double reference to both the Visitor and the ObjectStructure which holds a reference to the Element.

This particular implementation of the Visitor pattern extends the example used in Part I where a “pretend” visitor is an operation that provides the fill color of SVG images. In this implementation, the fill color operation is provided by an actual visitor object. A third and forth Element class have been added, one with a visitor (Triangle) and one that does not have a visitor (zigzag lines have no fill colors—just a stroke color.) Figure 2 shows the program as a file diagram:

Figure 2: File diagram of Visitor pattern in PHP

Figure 2: File diagram of Visitor pattern in PHP

To get an idea of what the application does and look at the overall code, run the program and download the files:
PlayDownload

When you run the program, you can see that the shape (concrete Element) and the color (concrete Visitor) are selected separately. Those separate selections are to highlight the concept of double-dispatch. A shape and color are selected with the understanding that the developer had not included a fill color originally, and instead of starting from scratch to re-program the shape selector, the developer added a visitor. To see how double-dispatch works in a Visitor pattern, follow the path from the Client to the ObjectStructure and to the IElement::accept() method.

Double-Dispatch and Traversing Elements with Visitors

Figure 3: ObjectStructure and IElement::accept() double-dispatch link

Figure 3: ObjectStructure and IElement::accept() double-dispatch link

One of the key participants in the Visitor pattern is the ObjectStructure class. The Gang of Four introduce the ObjectStructure participant to handle traversing the Element objects that may need the attention of a Visitor. The pattern solves the double-dispatch problem by including a concrete visitor in the Element::accept(IVisitor) method. However, the path from Client-request to double-dispatch first goes through the ObjectStructure class. By looking the Client, ObjectStructure and a concrete Element, you can see the double-dispatch process:

< ?php
/*
* CLIENT
*/
//Client.php
error_reporting(E_ALL | E_STRICT);
ini_set("display_errors", 1);
//Autoload code
function includeAll($className)
{
    include_once($className . '.php');
}
spl_autoload_register('includeAll');
 
//Begin Client class
class Client
{
    private static $shapeElement;
    private static $color;
    //client request
    public static function request()
    {
      self::$shapeElement=$_POST['shape'];
      self::$color=$_POST['color'];
 
      $obStructure = new ObjectStructure();
      $obStructure->attach(new self::$shapeElement());
      $colorVisitor= new self::$color();
      echo $obStructure->confirm($colorVisitor);
    } 
}
Client::request();
?>
 
 
< ?php
/*
* OBJECT STRUCTURE
*/
//ObjectStructure.php
class ObjectStructure
{
    private $elements=array();
 
    public function attach(IElement $element)
    {
         array_push($this->elements,$element);
    }
 
    public function confirm(IVisitor $visitor)
    {
         foreach($this->elements as $elementNow)
         {
              return $elementNow->accept($visitor);
         }
    }
}
?>
 
 
< ?php
/*
* ELEMENT
*/
//Circle.php
class Circle implements IElement
{
    private $visColor;
 
    public function accept(IVisitor $visitor)
    {
        $visitor->visitCircle($this);
        return $this->showShape();
    }
 
    private function showShape()
    {
        $circleShape= IElement::SVG . "<circle cx='110' cy='110' r='100' fill='{$this->doColor()}' stroke='blue' stroke-width='1' />";
        return $circleShape;
    }
 
    public function setColor($visitorColor)
    {
         $this->visColor = $visitorColor;
    }
 
    private function doColor()
    {
        return $this-> visColor;
    }
}
?>
 
</circle>

Stepping through the process, the Client first (1) instantiates an instance of ObjectStructure. Second (2) the Client uses the ObjectStructure::attach() method to push the selected element instance onto an array. Third (3) the Client passes the selected visitor to the ObjectStructure::confirm() method, which in turn, fourth (4) calls the Element::accept($v) method which passes the concrete visitor to all of the elements in the array. Since this example is very simple, it only includes one element and one visitor at a time, and so the array will only contain a single element. However, because of the ObjectStructure class, you can add more elements if needed. (The following sections show more detail on how double-dispatch works and how the visitors are implemented.)
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PHP OOP & Algorithms I: An Introduction

quadAvoiding the Misinformed

Programmers often spend more time un-doing bad information than using good information. One of the comments that set me off recently was someone “explaining” to others on a blog why PHP was not an object oriented language. Then he continued to blather on about the difference between compiled and interpreted languages. Whether or not a language is compiled or not has nothing to do with whether or not it is an object oriented language. Having interfaces, classes and communication between objects are the key criteria of an OOP language, and certainly since PHP5 has been a full-fledged OOP language. (We PHPers should not feel singled out because I recently saw post where a Java programmer pronounced that neither Python nor Perl were OOP, and she was “informed” otherwise by irate Python programmers. Perl has been OOP since V5.) So here I am again wasting time grumbling about people who don’t know what they’re talking about.

Instead of frothing at the mouth over the misinformed, I decided to spent more time with the well-informed. To renew my acquaintance with algorithms I began reading Algorithms 4th Ed. (2011) by Sedgewick and Wayne. Quickly, I learned some very basic truths about algorithms that had been only vaguely floating around in my head. First and foremost are the following:

Bad programmers worry about the code.
Good programmers worry about data structures and their relationships.
Linus Torvalds (Creator of Linux)

Since we’ve been spending time on this blog acting like good programmers, that was reassuring. In this post, I’d like to look at two things that are important for developing algorithms: 1) What to count as a “cost” in developing algorithms, and 2) Identifying good and bad algorithmic models. First, though, play and download the example. Using two different algorithms, a logarithmic and a linear (both pretty good ones), I’ve added “dots” to loop iterations to visually demonstrate the difference between a logarithmic algorithm (binary search) and a linear algorithm (loop). The “expense” of the algorithm can be seen in the number of dots generated.
PlayDownload

The example is a pretty simple one. However, since this blog is about PHP Design Patterns, I added a little Factory Method. The two algorithm classes act like clients making requests through the factory for a big string array with over 1,000 first names. Figure 1 shows the file diagram:

Figure 1: File diagram for use of Factory Method by two algorithm clients.

Figure 1: File diagram for use of Factory Method by two algorithm clients.

In looking at the file diagram, you may be thinking, “Why didn’t you use a Strategy pattern coupled with that Factory Method?” I thought about it, but then decided you could do it yourself. (Why should I have all the fun?)

Lesson 1: Leave the Bag of Pennies

The first lesson I learned in Bank Robbery 101 was to leave the bag of pennies. They’re just not worth it. Speed is everything in a bank robbery, and so you pay attention to how to get the most with the least time. The same thing applies to analyzing algorithms. For example, an object (as compared to an integer, boolean or string) has an overhead of 16 bytes. I have actually seen posts intoning, “objects are expensive…” Just to be clear,

Objects are not expensive. Iterations are expensive, quadratic algorithms are expensive.

In evaluating an algorithm you need to see how many operations must be completed or the size and nature of the N. An N made of up strings is different than an N made up of Booleans or integers. A quadratic (N²) and cubic (N³) algorithm are among the worst. They’re gobbling up kilo- or megabytes, and so that 16 bytes seems pretty silly to worry about. So instead of seeing an algorithm weight expressed as N² + 84 bytes, you’ll just see it expressed as ~N². (When you see a ~ (tilde) in an algorithm, it denotes ‘approximately.’) Another way of understanding the ~ is to note, They left the bag of pennies.

Lesson 2: Watch out for Nested Loops; they’re Quadratic!

I’ve never liked nested loops, and while I admit that I’ve used them before, I just didn’t like them. They were hard to unwind and refactor, and they always seemed to put a hiccup in the run-time. Now I know why I don’t like them; they’re quadratic.

Quadratic algorithms have the following feature: When the N doubles, the running time increases fourfold.

An easy way to understand the problem with quadradics is to consider a simple matrix or table. Suppose you start with a table of 5 rows and 5 columns. You would create 5² cells—25 cells. Now if you double the number to 10, 10² cells = 100. That’s 4 x 25. Double that 10 to 20 and your have 20² or 400. A nested loop has that same quality as your N increases. If both your inner and outer loop N increases, you’re heading for a massive slowdown.

Algorithms, OOP and Design Patterns are Mutually Exclusive

An important fact to remember is that good algorithms do not guarantee good OOP. Likewise, good OOP does not mean good algorithms. Good algorithms make your code execute more efficiently and effectively. Good OOP makes your programs easier to reuse, update, share and change. Using them together is the ultimate goal of a great program.

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PHP Memento Design Pattern Part II: Store & Retrieve

mementoWith a Little Help from Our Friends

As you saw in Part I of the Memento Design Pattern post, the design itself is fairly simple; at least judging from the class diagram. Also, in the first example, you saw how a state could be preserved in a Caretaker array and recalled upon request. However, I wanted to use the Memento with a more practical implementation of remembering a previous state to which users could return. For instance, the capacity to remember a choice on a Web page after looking at a series of choices would be an ideal use of the Memento pattern. The idea is to build an encapsulated set of objects that encompasses the UI, and the previous post shows how that can be accomplished. The latest problem encountered using the Memento pattern with PHP is that PHP doesn’t have the necessary UI event handlers, and the UI event handlers in JavaScript, while able to pass data, must do so through a PHP file; not an object.

The result is that each time JavaScript passes a bit of data, it also re-instantiates a class in a file. When that happens, all of the stored states are reset to null. So while the Memento is great at storing data in an array (or scalar for that matter), getting that state back with another call via JavaScript (even if it’s encapsulated in a PHP object) nulls all of the stored states.

So, while JavaScript is OK for handling UI events and passing states to PHP, every state passed resets any saved states because the participants have to be re-instantiated. After trying out different methods, I eventually reached the conclusion that I was going to have to stash the Memento’s current state in a JSON (JavaScript Object Notation) file. PHP includes JSON methods, and while this does not exactly solve the problem of passing data without resetting the state, it can preserve the state stored in a Memento object. Take a look at the example and download the files to see all of the code employed:
PlayDownload

JSON and PHP

For those of you unfamiliar with JSON and PHP, you can find it here in the PHP Manual. As noted, to work with PHP and a Memento design pattern the way I wanted to implement it required that I have some way to provide a persistent record of a “saved state.” In a nutshell, JSON is a faster-loading version of XML with hooks into PHP where data can be exchanged. That is an oversimplification to be sure, but as far as I was concerned if a state could be saved and retrieved quickly when wanted, my requirements would be met. I did not want to involve MySQL, XML or simple text files (even though JSON files [ext .json] are text files). JSON was the fastest in saving and retrieving, and PHP has methods for parsing JSON data.

The Caretaker

If you have not done so already, read Part I of the Memento Design Pattern. That will bring you up to speed on the structure and participants of the Memento design pattern.

The Caretaker participant in the Memento pattern is the warehouse for the saved Memento objects passed through the Originator. Essentially, the Memento is passed to the Caretaker where it is stored until called for retrieval. However, a PHP object cannot be stored as a straight JSON file, and so once the Memento object is passed to the Caretaker (in this example), I passed the Memento value to a JSON file. The second Caretaker method returns the stored JSON value directly to the client rather than re-loading a Memento object and returning it. You can see how this all works in the Caretaker class code:

< ?php
class Caretaker
{
    private $storage;
    private $caretakerStore;
    private $caretakerStorage;
 
    public function addMemento (Memento $m)
    {
	$jsonData["hold"][0] = $m->getState();
	$this->caretakerStore="store.json";
	file_put_contents($this->caretakerStore,json_encode($jsonData,JSON_UNESCAPED_UNICODE));
    }
 
    public function getMemento()
    {
	$this->caretakerStorage = file_get_contents("store.json");
	$jsonData = json_decode($this->caretakerStorage,true);
	$this->storage= $jsonData["hold"][0];
	return $this->storage;
    }
}
?>

The two methods in the Caretaker are pretty straightforward getter/setter ones. The addMemento($m) method expects to receive a Memento object. (The type hint enforces it to.) However, instead of storing the entire Memento as was done in the example in Part I, the Caretaker uses the Memento’s getState() method to access the saved state. Then the state is stored in an associative array element named “hold.” ($jsonData[“hold”][0]). Written to a .json file the saved state might look like the following:

{"hold":["7"]}

The value “7” is the saved string that is used to recall the correct file (dp7.jpg) in the patterns folder. While this might appear to be breaking encapsulation, the value is returned in a Caretaker private property, $this->storage.

To get a better sense of the Caretaker in the context of this particular implementation take a look at Figure 2:

Figure 2: File diagram of Memento used for recalling Web image

Figure 2: File diagram of Memento used for recalling Web image

The PhpCatcher class is an attempt to encapsulate the HTML UI into an object and have methods available to set and retrieve Memento object values using the Caretaker as a warehouse. To set the Memento and send it to the Caretaker, the exact same object communications are used as in Part I. However, the Caretake extracts the value from the Memento and stores it in the .json file instead of in a PHP array that stays extant through UI interactions. So, to recall a Memento value, the PhpCatcher goes directly to the Caretaker’s getMemento() method. (Perhaps a more accurate name for the getter would be getMementoValue().) In any event, at the time of this posting, I was unable to find a way to store the Memento in a JSON object and retrieve it; so the PHPCatcher communicates directly with the Caretaker as a client.

You need to use PHP 5.4+ and you need to set your .json file permissions

  • The PHP built-in JSON methods and constants used require PHP 5.4. If you find it impossible to install 5.4, instead of using JSON, you can use a text file, an XML file or even a MySQL file for storing the Memento value.
  • File permissions are grouped into three categories:

    1. Owner
    2. Group
    3. Everyone

    Further, each permission has three levels:

    1. Read
    2. Write
    3. Execute

    You need to set your .json file so that everyone can read, write and execute the .json file. I set mine for ‘777’ so that all groups and the owner had total access. On your computer or LAN, there’s not a lot to worry about; however, if you are nervous about opening up your .json file to the world on your hosting service, you need to read up on permissions security to see if doing so will cause unwanted problems.

If you’re using a Raspberry Pi, you can find out how to change your permissions for this implementation here.

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